Book Review – The Goodbye Look (Ross Macdonald)

The Goodbye Look

Ross Macdonald

1969

“There was a bald spot on the crown of his head, with a little hair brushed over to mask his vulnerability. The beatings that people took from their children, I was thinking, were the hardest to endure and the hardest to escape.”

One of the later entries into the Ross Macdonald’s series of novels to feature the private detective Lew Archer, The Goodbye Look is a complex crime novel looking into the lives of two American families, bound together by secrecy, crime and murder. Continue reading

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Book Review – If The Dead Rise Not (Philip Kerr)

If the Dead Rise Not

Philip Kerr

2009

Grief: I no longer had patience for it. What did it matter when you grieved for people when they died? It certainly couldn’t bring them back. And they weren’t even particularly grateful for your grief. The living always get over the dead. That’s what the dead never realize. Even if the dead did come back, they’d only have been sore that somehow you managed to get over their dying at all.”

The sixth book in Philip Kerr’s series of novels focused around German PI Bernie Gunther, If the Dead Rise Not is another strong entry into the series, and returns to the compelling highs set by earlier entries A German Requiem and The One from the Other. Continue reading

Film Review – Angels With Dirty Faces (1938)

Angels With Dirty Faces

1938

Director: Michael Curtiz

Whaddya’ hear whaddya’ say?”

 

One of the genre’s most renowned works, Angels With Dirty Faces is a classic gangster film which gives James Cagney one of his most memorable roles, and which makes a true attempt to present something different and take a new look at the role of gangsters in a post-prohibition society.

Released in 1938 and directed by Casablanca and Yankee Doodle Dandy director Michael Curtiz, the film centres around Rocky Sullivan (Cagney), a life-long tough guy who has spent lift in and out of various prisons since childhood, and the story picks up following his latest prison release, having taken a fall for a $100,000 armed robbery so that his ‘associate’, a crooked lawyer called Jim Frazier (played by a young Humphrey Bogart) can set up a criminal outfit with the proceeds from their past endeavours, only to find himself double-crossed and eventually forced to blackmail his gang in order get his ‘cut’, setting him up for inevitable conflict amongst his former associates. Continue reading